Predictive Value of Serum Interleukins in Children with Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

  • Azar Nickavar ORCID GS PM Mail Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Iran University Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Ehsan Valavi ORCID GS PM Chronic Renal Failure Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
  • Baranak Safaeian GS PM Neonatal and Children’s Health Research Center, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran
  • Parisa Amoori ORCID GS PM Chronic Renal Failure Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
  • Mostafa Moosavian ORCID GS PM Faculty of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
Keywords:
Child, Cytokines, Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, Steroids

Abstract

Pro-inflammatory cytokines have been suggested in the pathogenesis of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS), with conflicting results. This study was performed to identify alteration of different serum interleukins (ILs) in children with INS, and their predictive value in response to steroid treatment. Three groups of children (27; steroid-sensitive INS, 21; steroid-resistant INS, and 19 healthy controls) with normal serum C3, negative serologic tests of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immune deficiency virus (HIV), and parasitic infections were included in this study. Serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, and IL-18 were measured, using quantitative colorimetric sandwich ELISA kits. Children with secondary nephrotic syndrome, inflammations, systemic disorders, and chronic kidney disease were excluded. The serum concentration of all ILs; except IL-13 and IL-18; was significantly higher in children with INS, compared with the healthy controls. Serum IL-2 had the highest sensitivity of (95.24%) in patients with INS. All of the serum ILs had acceptable accuracy in children with INS, compared with the control group. The serum concentration of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 was significantly higher in children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS), compared with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). All of these ILs had acceptable accuracy for the prediction of steroid response in patients with INS. Our findings suggested the pathogenic role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in children with INS, of which IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were accurate biomarkers for the prediction of steroid response in these patients.

 

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Published
2020-12-19
How to Cite
1.
Nickavar A, Valavi E, Safaeian B, Amoori P, Moosavian M. Predictive Value of Serum Interleukins in Children with Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome. Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 19(6):632-639.
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