Distinctive Expression of Bone Metabolism-related Genes between PBMCs from Condylar Hyperplasia, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients

Bone metabolism in Condylar Hyperplasia patients

  • Reza Amirzargar ORCID Department of Craniofacial Surgery, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Gholamreza Shirani ORCID Department of Craniofacial Surgery, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Shokoufeh Raisian ORCID Department of Craniofacial Surgery, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Maryam Davoudi ORCID Rheumatology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Saeed Aslani ORCID Rheumatology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Shiva Poursani ORCID Rheumatology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Shaghayegh Khanmohammadi ORCID Rheumatology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mahdi Mahmoudi ORCID Mail Rheumatology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sceinces, Tehran, Iran AND Inflammation Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mohammad Bayat ORCID Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND Craniomaxillofacial Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords:
Ankylosing spondylitis, Bone morphogenetic proteins, Condylar hyperplasia, Rheumatoid ‎arthritis

Abstract

Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and wingless (Wnt) signaling molecules and their antagonists, such as sclerostin and noggin, have been identified to have different effects on bone metabolism. This research intended to evaluate the transcript levels of CTNNB1 (catenin beta 1protein), SOST (sclerostin protein), BMP4 (Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 protein), and NOG (noggin protein) bone metabolism-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from condylar hyperplasia (CH) patients in comparison to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and healthy individuals.
PBMCs were separated from blood samples of 10 patients with CH, AS, RA, and 10 healthy controls. SYBR Green real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for quantitative analysis of CTNNB1, SOST, BMP4, and NOG messenger RNAs (mRNAs).
The expression of CTNNB1 was significantly upregulated in CH and AS patients compared with healthy individuals and RA patients. The difference of SOST expression was not significant between all groups. The BMP4 expression was significantly downregulated in AS, CH, and RA patients compared with healthy controls. The NOG expression was downregulated in RA, AS, and CH groups, however, it was only significant in CH and RA patients compared with controls.CH and AS patients were distinguished from RA by the upregulatedCTNNB1 expression.
These results demonstrated that CTNNB1, BMP4, and NOG, but not SOST, may contribute to the pathogenesis of CH, AS, and RA.

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Published
2020-10-18
How to Cite
1.
Amirzargar R, Shirani G, Raisian S, Davoudi M, Aslani S, Poursani S, Khanmohammadi S, Mahmoudi M, Bayat M. Distinctive Expression of Bone Metabolism-related Genes between PBMCs from Condylar Hyperplasia, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients. Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 19(5):539-544.
Section
Brief Communication