Inhibition of Airway Contraction and Inflammation by Pomalidomide in a Male Wistar Rat Model of Ovalbumin-induced Asthma

  • Majid Ghaderi Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
  • Shahrbanoo Oryan Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
  • Namdar Yousofvand Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran
  • Akram Eidi Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Asthma, Inflammation, Platelet-derived growth factor, Pomalidomide, TNF- α

Abstract

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways of the lungs. Pomalidomide (POM) a therapy for multiple myeloma has been stated to have an anti-inflammatory effect. The main goal of the present study was to assess its possible effect on airway contraction and inflammation in a rat model of ovalbumin-induced asthma. Different groups of rats received saline or pomalidomide (0.4, 0.8 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg). The asthma was induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Trachea contraction was assayed by organ bath system. Airway histology was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin method. Serum Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level was analyzed by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGFα) Gene expressions were evaluated by Real-time PCR. Pomalidomide prevented ovalbumin-induced airway contraction and histopathological damage. In addition serum, TNF-α level was significantly (p<0.05) decreased in POM treated animals compared to control (asthmatic animals that received POM vehicle). Results indicate that POM prevented the PDGF expression induced by ovalbumin. In conclusion, we found that pomalidomide ameliorated the symptoms, histopathological changes and inflammatory markers induced by ovalbumin in asthmatic rats and these effects might be related to its anti-inflammatory properties.

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Published
2019-04-01
How to Cite
1.
Ghaderi M, Oryan S, Yousofvand N, Eidi A. Inhibition of Airway Contraction and Inflammation by Pomalidomide in a Male Wistar Rat Model of Ovalbumin-induced Asthma. Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 18(2):209-217.
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Original Article(s)