Iranian Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology 2017. 16(3):256-270.

The Extract of Portulaca oleracea and Its Constituent, Alpha Linolenic Acid Affects Serum Oxidant Levels and Inflammatory Cells in Sensitized Rats
Mahsa Kaveh, Akram Eidi, Ali Nemati, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady

Abstract


The effects of Portulaca oleracea and its constituent, alpha linolenic acid on serum oxidant levels and inflammatory cells in sensitized rats were examined. Eight groups of rats including control, sensitized, sensitized rats treated with 1, 2 and 4 mg/mL extract of P. oleracea, 0.2 and 0.4 mg/mL alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and 1.25 μg/mL dexamethaswere studied serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT, thiol groups, NO2, NO3, and Malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as total and differential WBC in blood were measured. Serum concentrations of SOD, CAT and thiol were significantly decreased but NO2, NO3 and MDA as well as total WBC number and percentages of eosinophil and neutrophil were increased in sensitized group (p<0.001 for all cases).Treatment of sensitized animals with dexamethasone, high concentrations of the extract and ALA improved all measured variables except monocyte for all three treatment groups and eosinophil for dexamethasone treatment (p<0.01 to p<0.001). In addition, treatment with low and medium extract and low ALA concentrations improved serum levels of NO2, NO3 and total WBC count (p<0.001 for all cases). Neutrophil and lymphocyte percentages and serum level of thiol also improved due to treatment with medium extract and low ALA concentration (p<0.01 to p<0.001). Medium extract and low ALA treatment also caused improvement of serum level of CAT and eosinophil percentage as well as SOD level respectively (p<0.01 to p<0.001). The effect of the extract of P. oleracea and ALA on serum oxidants and inflammatory cells were demonstrated in sensitized rats, which was comparable with dexamethasone effects at used concentrations.


Keywords


Alpha linolenic acid; Oxidant and antioxidant levels; Portulaca oleracea; Sensitized rats; White blood cell

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