The Association between Inflammatory Cytokines and miRNAs with Slow Coronary Flow Phenomenon

Inflammation in Slow Coronary Flow Phenomenon

  • Shahla Danaii Department of Gynecology, Eastern Azerbaijan ACECR ART Center, Eastern Azerbaijan Branch of ACECR, Tabriz, Iran
  • Sadaf Shiri Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran AND Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Sanam Dolati Aging Research Institute, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran AND Student's Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Majid Ahmadi Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran AND Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Leila Ghahremani-Nasab Department of Cardiac Surgery, Tabriz University of Medical, Tabriz, Iran
  • Atefeh Amiri Aging Research Institute, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Amin Kamrani Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Hossein Samadi Kafil Department of Microbiology and Virology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Forough Chakari-Khiavi Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Mohammad Hojjat-Farsangi Department of Oncology-Pathology, Immune and Gene Therapy Lab, Cancer Center Karolinska (CCK), Karolinska University Hospital Solna and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Aida Malek Mahdavi Connective Tissue Diseases Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Amir Mehdizadeh Endocrine Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran AND Comprehensive Health Lab, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Mehdi Yousefi Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran AND Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
Keywords: Cytokines, Inflammation, miRNA, Slow coronary flow

Abstract

Slow coronary flow (SCF) is a coronary artery disorder. Several inflammatory mediators have been reported to be associated with vascular homeostasis and endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between cytokines and miRNAs in patients with SCF compared to the controls. In this regard, blood samples were acquired from 45 SCF patients and 45 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated. Expression levels of miRNAs and cytokines in PBMCs were measured by real-time PCR. As a final point, serum levels of cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Expression levels of miR-1, miR-133, miR-208a, miR-206, miR-17, miR-29, miR-223, miR-326, and miR-155 as considerable indicators of inflammatory function significantly increased in SCF patients while the expression levels of miR-15a, miR-21, miR-25, miR-126, miR-17, miR-16 and miR-18a as considerable indicators of anti-inflammatory function significantly decreased in patients with SCF compared to the control group. Additionally, serum IL-1β, IL‐8, and TNF-α concentrations were significantly higher in the SCF group than controls. However, no significant differences were observed in IL-10 production in SCF patients compared to the controls. This study provided the potential role of miRNAs as biomarkers for SCF diagnosis as well as suitable markers for monitoring coronary artery disease (CAD) development in these patients. More investigations are still necessary to unravel the detailed essential mechanisms of circulating miRNA levels in patients with heart failure and SCF.

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Published
2020-02-01
How to Cite
1.
Danaii S, Shiri S, Dolati S, Ahmadi M, Ghahremani-Nasab L, Amiri A, Kamrani A, Samadi Kafil H, Chakari-Khiavi F, Hojjat-Farsangi M, Malek Mahdavi A, Mehdizadeh A, Yousefi M. The Association between Inflammatory Cytokines and miRNAs with Slow Coronary Flow Phenomenon. Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 19(1):56-64.
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Original Article(s)